A great cause: THE NEHRLING GARDENS

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The Henry Nehrling Society, Inc. was established in 1999 by a group of concerned citizens to preserve Dr. Nehrling’s home and horticultural legacy. In 2000, the Society incorporated as a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit public charitable organization. The Society’s first accomplishment was having Palm Cottage Gardens placed on the National Register of Historic Places in November 2000. Since then the Society has focused on educating the public about Dr. Nehrling’s importance to the horticultural history of Florida. In November 2009, the Society acquired the home and gardens to accomplish its purpose as stated below.

The Mission of the Henry Nehrling Society is to preserve Dr. Nehrling’s historic home and gardens in Gotha, Florida, and provide a History and Horticultural Education Center focusing on environmental conservation and to:

  • Honor Dr. Nehrling’s horticultural and ornithological achievements.
  • Preserve the remaining historical home and gardens in Gotha, Florida.
  • Recognize the community’s historical and German-American cultural heritage.
  • Teach environmentally sound gardening and landscaping practices through horticultural classes and demonstration gardens; provide education for wetlands restoration and conservation.
  • Assist in the conservation and protection of natural resources in Central Florida.

To learn more about the Henry Nehrling Society and the Nehrling Gardens in Gotha, please visit: nehrlinggardens.org or nehrlinggardens.wordpress.com

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A Love of Japanese Gardens

Nothing in a Japanese Garden is left to nature or chance.  Every piece is carefully selected and placed in a specific way to create a series of vignettes or moments of interest throughout the garden.  

The Japanese garden is a miniature representation of a picturesque world.  Techniques used vary and designers often play with proportion to create the illusion of depth, and utilize smaller scale items such as rocks and water features as symbols of land and sea.  Items outside the garden such as temples or rolling hills are incorporated into the landscape to make the spaces seem much more expansive.  Balance is also incredibly important, but not necessarily symmetry.  The spaces and pathways are meant to be soothing and welcoming to its visitors; but also provoke moments of curiosity by concealing elements from certain angles, encouraging further exploration.

Some traditional elements found in a traditional Japanese Garden:
Rocks, Sand, Bridges, Stone Lanterns, Water Basins, Fences, Gates, Trees, Flowers