Designer Profile: HERVE VAN DER STRAETEN

The designer’s aesthetic from interiors to jewels, is simply stunning: Sculptural, modern, and completely original…  At any scale, his work is both revolutionary and inspirational.

Maker of Modern Fantasy: JAIME HAYON

Spanish artist-designer Jaime Hayon pushes the boundaries of design in striking form. Hayon was born in Madrid in 1974 and spent his University years studying industrial design in both his hometown and Paris. Although Hayon excelled in his studies, he never felt too connected to the traditional and logical design curriculum. Rather than subscribing to a specific category, Hayon felt compelled to lend his designs a unique touch and take risks.

Times magazine has included Hayon as one of the 100 most relevant creators of our times and Wallpaper magazine has listed him as one of the most influential creators of the last decade. With offices in Italy, Spain and UK, Hayon’s main interest is to find challenges and new perspectives. His vision blurs the lines between art, decoration and design bringing back a renaissance in finely-crafted, intricate objects within the context of contemporary design culture: creating furniture, product, interiors, sculptures and art Installations.

His unique style was first fully exposed in ‘Mediterranean Digital Baroque’ at London’s David Gill Gallery, followed by many exhibitions and installations set up in major galleries and museums worldwide. His concern for the conservation of craft skills and his way of challenging design has led him to develop renowned work for Baccarat, Fritz Hansen, The Groninger Museum, Bisazza, Bosa, La Terraza del Casino de Madrid, Lladró, MagisEstablished & Sons and Fabergé among many others. Hayon has also collaborated with such reputable names as Benetton, Metalarte, Coca-Cola, Adidas, and Camper. He continues to keep busy pushing limits of design well into his career as has from the start. With the definition of design in a constant flux, Hayon excels in the void. “Today I don’t know my definition of design, but I do know it’s a very interesting moment for design, because there is more acceptance, it’s more hybrid.”

Hayon explains, “At a certain moment I was absolutely not interested in [traditional design], so I went through a different road. I was more interested in underground art, it opened my mind to see things differently.” This urge to create holds deep roots in his adolescence spent in Madrid where he immersed himself in skateboard and graffiti cultures, expanding the already whimsical imagination that is ever-present in his work today.

Sources: Hayon Studio & Cool Hunting

All sketches in this post: Copyright © Jaime Hayon

Bionic design: JORIS LAARMAN

“Joris Laarman’s Bone Chair revolutionized the design process by using an algorithm to translate the complexity, proportion and functionality of human bone and tree growth into a chair form. The algorithm, originally used by the German car industry, enabled him to reduce and strengthen his designs by optimizing material allocation, weight and stability, while minimizing material input. In his own words, he sculpted “using mother nature’s underlying codes.”

Bionic design is the combination of the latest technological processing methods and organic form. The Bone Chair (2006) by the Netherlands designer Joris Laarman, was a prime example of this trend. Inspired by the growth of bones, this elegant high tech sculpture was created with the help of a special tool developed by General Motors Engineering Europe.

For their recent installation at the High Museum in Atlanta, Joris Laarman Lab has programmed a robot arm to build ornamented side tables based on a digital blueprint. The following video will give you a behind the scenes look at the Laarman Lab’s process. The robot builds the table upside down, from the top to the legs. The installation explores the concept of pixels in design as well as a play on our visual perception of objects.

 

Click here to visit the official Joris Laarman Lab website

Source: Friedman Benda, NYC