A Love of Japanese Gardens

Nothing in a Japanese Garden is left to nature or chance.  Every piece is carefully selected and placed in a specific way to create a series of vignettes or moments of interest throughout the garden.  

The Japanese garden is a miniature representation of a picturesque world.  Techniques used vary and designers often play with proportion to create the illusion of depth, and utilize smaller scale items such as rocks and water features as symbols of land and sea.  Items outside the garden such as temples or rolling hills are incorporated into the landscape to make the spaces seem much more expansive.  Balance is also incredibly important, but not necessarily symmetry.  The spaces and pathways are meant to be soothing and welcoming to its visitors; but also provoke moments of curiosity by concealing elements from certain angles, encouraging further exploration.

Some traditional elements found in a traditional Japanese Garden:
Rocks, Sand, Bridges, Stone Lanterns, Water Basins, Fences, Gates, Trees, Flowers


Details are everything: BOOKMATCHED STONE SURFACES

Bookmatching is the practice of matching two or more surfaces, resulting in adjoining surfaces that mirror each other in appearance, giving the impression of an opened book. This unique installation technique is primarily used for marble, onyx, quartzite, alabaster and granite slabs. These stones share the common characteristic of having strong veins and lines that, when bookmatched, create very geometric patterns that make your floor, walls or countertops much more interesting. The symmetry and balance in the resulting patterns are undeniably beautiful. These surfaces perform like singular fingerprints for the home, and like everything found in nature; no pattern repeats itself twice.

La Purificadora Hotel

Located in the city of Puebla, Mexico, La Purificadora Hotel has colonial heritage and is registered as historical patrimony. The building used to be an ice factory where water was bottled and purified. Now fully restored as a boutique hotel, it was designed with the following facilities: 26 guestrooms, reception-shop, restaurant-bar, kitchen, ballrooms for events, patio with a 4-floor-height, meeting rooms, offices, and cave.

The facades have the same treatment as the old building, extending plaster and stone along all its height. Main materials used are: stone (from the original construction) and old wood that contrast with the contemporary materials such as glass and steel incorporated in to the new design, as well as specially designed tiles for the bedrooms floors and onyx in the restrooms. During the intense remodeling process, the archeologist found many glass pieces that belonged to the original building and were incorporated into the graphic design of the hotel.

Dive into La Purificadora

Source: ArchDaily

Made in Spain: A-CERO

A-cero is a Spanish architecture and urban design studio established by Architects Joaquín Torres & Rafael Llamazares, with offices in Madrid, La Coruña and Dubai. They were first recognized for their use of clean lines and sculptural forms in single-family residential projects in Spain, but have recently been involved in more complex international projects.

Click here to learn more about A-cero

Scents with History and Architecture: ARQUISTE

With a background in Architecture and Historic Preservation from universities in Spain, Mexico City, and New York City, Carlos Huber has taken his longtime love of fragrance, applied his other loves: history and art, and merged them together to form Arquiste Parfumeur, his new line of luxury fragrances. With an immaculate attention to detail, Huber joined with two top Givaudan perfumers to create a range of six unisex perfumes. Each scent is an olfactive interpretation of an exact moment in history that is meticulously researched and finely tuned. Arquiste’s debut collection of six distinct scents take us from Aztec temples (circa 1400) to a 17th-century encounter between European royals.              

–  Mark David Boberek, The Perfume Magazine

 

“I’ve always been very connected to my nose and every time I would do research on a building or city for work I would come across an anecdote, a part of the story, where I would think “What did it smell like?” – Carlos Huber

 

Time Travel in a Bottle: 6 Transportive Scents from ARQUISTE